About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CSPAN 7
WJZ (CBS) 6
WMAR (ABC) 6
CSPAN2 5
WJLA (ABC) 4
CNN 2
WRC (NBC) 2
WTTG 2
WBFF (FOX) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
in u.s. history a fact not lost on those here at the pumps. the price affects everything from flying to fruits and veggies. how much is that hurting you? >> it's really bad. it's really bad, probably about $75 to $80 to fill this up oar are our country uses 400 million gallons of gas a day. >> right now it's an easy $4. that's already there in california. wouldn't be surprised to see a this get closer to $5. >> reporter: that doesn't sit well here in baltimore. >> it's troubling. it does not stop me from driving around because necessity overweighs the cost of the gas and you just have to make it work. >> reporter: at the pump there's acceptance. they stay it will go to $5. >> that's fine. >> reporter: california is the worst. the mountain states the best. maryland is somewhere in the middle. >> got to go to work. got to pick my kids up. got to do what i got to do. >> reporter: the u.s. government has a strategic gasoline reserve of three quarters of a billion gallons of gas. jess, back to you . >> the last time that reserve was tapped, prices went down 25 cents. >> we're learning mor
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
-fly zone. >> as doug luzader shows us now, the white house is trying to dial back the u.s. involvement in the mission. >> reporter: the u.s. plans to step back now from the primary leadership role in this libian operation just as the international consensus may be fraying: a reinvigorate the option in libya and a path way of a destruction of what remained of gadhafi forces that were closed in on a rebel stronghold. the pounding from u.s. and coalition forces has begun to subside. the emphasis is on locking down the air space over the libian capital. >> with the growing capabilities of the coalition, i anticipate the no-fly zone will soon extend to drega and misratta and then to tripoli. >> reporter: and some countries are questioning how this will play out. the bomb and missile attacks have gone beyond taking out anti-aircraft batteries. and while the president has not altered his latin american tour schedule, while in chile he did make clear that u.s. will soon play more of a background role. >> let me emphasize that we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and
of that u.s. fighter jet and we are happy to report both crew members are safe and in u.s. hands. we are covering the angles from the points on the map. nic robertson in tripoli and chris lawrence at the pentagon and retired navy captain alec frazier is here at the cnn center. chris, what is the pentagon saying about this? >> reporter: well, they are saying, bottom line, carol, is that both of these crew members are now off libyan soil and safely back in u.s. hands, but the story of how they got there, is just fascinating. this crew took off from a base in italy overnight and they were on a strike mission. in other words, they weren't necessarily just patrolling. this was a fighter jet specifically designed to go after some of moammar gadhafi's air defense systems. overnight at some point, the military plane got into some mechanical problems and both of the crew members ejected. their chutes worked just fine but they landed in different places. the pilot was picked up by an osprey. that was sitting off the coast about a hundred miles on the "uss kearsarge." the marines, the 26 marine
, they may not dangers that people here in the u-s are worried about too. phe radiation is leaking from two nuclear reactors along thh pacific coast, that were heavvly daaaged by the earthquake. then yesterday, another explosion shook the region, damaging a containment poolland exposing part or all of the nuclear fuel rods iim still very concerned about what might happen to these are designed to not fail, but - so many things that were not supposed happen have hhppened or things that were supposed to happen have noo happened. elevated radiation levels were detected 25 miles south of ttkyo.and now, there's fear in the u-s about radiation poisoning here.many people are buying anti-radiation medication.one company has already sold out......another medication doesn't require a prescription.but, health officials on the west coast say... the distanne between japan anddthe united states will disperse almost all of the radiaaion before it even getsshere.washington state ii nearly 5 thousand miles froo japan.we are nearly 7-thousand miles away here n baltimore. as fears over radiation poisoning gr
residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moammar gadhafi. he's seen in the video there. many saying this really does pave the way for a military action. what could that mean? what could it look like? we'll get you the very latest on that coming up here. >> exactly. but first let's begin with the very latest on the disaster in japan. the danger level is being raised in
by general electric. 23 are now in operation across the u.s. >> this is the system that has proved unreliable. >> paul gunter tells wjz, the aging mark 1 design is unsafe and should be shut down. >> it represents not only a bad design but an aging facility. any number of events could be the match that lights the next nuclear fire. >> reporter: but a spokesman for peach bottom says comparing fukushima to his plant is problematic. but peach bottom has more numerous safety inspections. and the tsunami caused many of the problems at fukushima, an event unlikely to happen here. >> please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: advocates also point to lessons learned from the partial meltdown on nearby three-mile island in 2009. saying the industry is now safer. >> the actions taken by the industry since 3-mile island has prepared us to deal with events just like japan and maybe even worse. >> reporter: japan's nuclear crisis, has caused concern. >> that's just something you deal with every day. it makes you think twice when you hear the sirens go off. >> it doesn't need to be a tsunami
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
him. >> they have identified him as aaron thomas. u.s. marshals arrested him at his home friday afternoon. >> i did not know what was going on. >> the neighbors were shocked to learn that he faced sex assault, burglary, and weapons charges in connection with 17 attacks, including 12 rapes in virginia, maryland, connecticut, and rhode island. investigators say dna evidence was crucial in solving these cases. about 12 cases have been linked by dna to the same offender. >> acting on a tip, the fbi put him under surveillance a couple days ago. >> we confirmed that thomas was the east coast. this. and among the 12 cases, an 18- year-old woman raped in these woods. residents who live across the street are grateful. >> that is wonderful that our technology can do this. it is amazing. >> this is the sketch that the police have been circulating. they have not released a mug shot of thomas yet. they're hoping the victims will identify him in a lineup. he is doing court in connecticut on monday. richard reeve, abc 7 news. >>> we are on storm watch. heavy rains are on the way. the rest of t
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
officials are saying about u.s. involvement in libya. a live look now at the night sky in libya. a u.s. f-15 crashes today. and right now, an investigation is wrapping up. joel brown reports for wjz on what brought that plane down. >> reporter: all that is left of the f-15 that crashed in libya, is this burned-out shell. witnesses say the two american pilots who were ejected safely, were greeted as heroes. the pentagon blames equipment failure for the crash. the two pilots aren't badly hurt and are back in american hands. it's the first major loss that u.s. officials are calling a success. >> virtually all of our targets are isolated. >> reporter: they launched another 24 missile at gadhafi's compound today. and they extended the no-fly zone over eastern libya. the u.s. is eager to hand over control of the operation. >> a transfer within a few days is likely. >> reporter: it's still not clear just who the u.s. will turn over control to. either britain, france, or nato forces could take over. still, many rebels say the job is far from done. >> reporter: the loosely- organized group of rebels,
reporting this on "world news" last night. more missile strikes for the u.s. and allies against libya. now, from is growing concern over how gadhafi will respond. and whether he will make good on his threat of terrorism. >>> and the latest from japan this morning. official there's saying the death toll now tops 18,000 this morning. an incredible number. and new concerns about radiation. contamina contaminating, not only the tap water, but the vegetables there and seafood. we'll have a live report from the quake zone. >>> and in this country, a spring roared in california. a rockslide, shutting down highways there. >> the first full day of spring, david. >>> let's get right to libya. and the latest actions by the u.s. and its allies. french fighter jets for the third day in a row, headed to libya. we have a team of correspondents, covering all of the angles this morning, starting with martha raddatz, where she has been reporting all through the night. >> reporter: good morning, robin. the strikes have truly intensified. hitting military targets all over libya, including those that gadhafi,
to be qaddafi's presidential compound. still, both the brits and the u.s. military leaders say qaddafi is not the target of this mission. >> this is not about going -- going after qaddafi himself or attacking him at this particular point in time. it's about achieving these narrow and relatively limited objectives so that he stops killing his people and so humanitarian support can be provided. >> still, certainly it is sys m symbolic to the libyan leader can hit his home. our defense secretary says the u.s. role in this effort should begin to diminish. >> we expect that in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role in the coalition. but we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> admiral mullin says that support role will include intelligence support, jamming capabilities and assistance with the overall mission and the no-fly zone. back to you guys in new york. >> thanks for setting the table. john kerry, seniator sessions, admiral mullin, e
's not going to happen. it's not going to change. but it seems that the u.s. is trying to do a last-ditch effort to prevent a slaughter in ben g again ghazi. and he said don't bomb us. it was very strange. listen to what he said. >> we want, even americans, to help us get rit of the remnants of those people and have a peaceful country. we want you to help us 20, you know, middle east democracy. more freedom. being peaceful. but not to threaten us with air strikes. we will not be afraid. >> and he said whatever happens is not going to cause his father to leave office. >> but i couldn't help but when we were listening with george. if you're waking up this morning and you hear that his father is considering shooting down passenger planes. american passenger planes. is he serious about that? >> well, the defense minister made that threat. and they did do lockerbie. they've taken admission for it. clearly, one of the things that happens is you have to be prepared for some kind of retaliation. and they're threatening terrorism. >> what's your gut here? >> the gut is they don't have signif
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
to support humanitarian aide. the u.s., with britain and france will continue hitting ground targets. nato could take over operations, but nato members are resisting ground operations. secretary hillary clinton will travel to london to help coordinate the strategy. the crisis in libya is prompting a protest tomorrow. >> there is a catch. >> the change that is metro is making to increase your security at rail stations. >> one of the biggest lottery jackpots in history. picture. >> psychologically t helps. it is a frosty cold. scraping the ice off the windshield, 32 at reagan, upper 20s in the rural areas this morning. mid 20s in the mountains. sun will be up in 25 minutes, by 9:00, upper 30s, climbing into the 40s by mid afternoon, increasing clouds. overnight, it will get cold again. in fact, by midnight, if you will be out for march madness this evening, layer up. by dawn, saturday, near 30 degrees. yes, still looking like a chance of snow, updated analysis, new information coming in. updated forecast for the potential for snow on sunday, in ten minutes. >> chopper 4, over gaithersburg. j
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
was charged. >> the attacks killed five people and sickened 17 others. >>> u.s. and coalition forces are targeting troops on the ground. but the libyan leader insists he's not going anywhere. joel brown reports for wjz from the state department. >> reporter: more coalition warplanes are flying toward libya, to control its skies. and for the first time, u.s. commanders say they're using the jets to attack gadhafi's gadhafi's troops on the ground. it may be working. in the key eastern city of misrata, gadhafi tanks are beginning to retreat, after the continuing assault on civilians. rebelts have new-- benles have -- rebels have newfound confidence. >> this is a matter of time. after one day, these tanks will surrender. >> reporter: president obama says sending in u.s. troops on the ground is absolutely out of the question. u.s. forces are already scaling back flights over libya. coalition troops are now flying more than half of the missions. bombed but not broken, moammar gadhafi appeared for the first time in public tuesday night. he rallied supportersers and portrayed himself a victi
. back to you. >> tonight, former dc school chancellor is blasting a u.s.a. report that questions whether some dc students had earned their standardized test scores. >> this report based on statistics said so many wrong students answers were erased and made to right ones. bruce johnson has been working this story and has more. bruce. >> former dc school chancellor says the u.s.a. today report lacks credibility, but you'll hear in this report that school officials at some point became so concerned after test results were changed at one school that people in charge of the testing were removed from their position. >> michelle reid will appear on national tv tonight to respond to questions raised about student test scores on her watch. >> if you look at the story overall, i think it absolutely lacks credibility. >> reid tells pbs talk show moderator there were questions raised about the high number of incorrect answers changed to correct answers. but she says an outside security firm found no wrong doing. >> when the academic achievement rates of a district like dc go up, peopl
is raising the severity level of the nuclear crisis. >> and the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says it will now undergo a review after president obama ordered them to take a look at all nuclear plants. more americans are returning whom >> reporter: the line is long in tokyo airport. for some, the fear of radiation is too much to handling. we have been advised by the u.s. ambassador and a nuclear expert friend of mine that we should get out of here now. otherwise, we would not leave. we love it here. >> it's for my children that i scare. >> some are bringing trace radiation. >> does it concern you that they found trace radiation levels on these planes? >> i didn't know that. i didn't know that. that is a little concerning. sure, it is aren't i would go the other way. i'm not that concerned. i think it's going to be minor at this point. >> reporter: a medical shipment from dallas also showed a small amount of radiation. they are keeping the aircraft away from any potentially radioactive clouds that they are dog. atmospheric monitoring stations in northern california -- southern califo
to be talking about the u.s. comfort and today's hot topic which is unusual but you love this story. >> you love the kinds of stories and they come from the strangest places. a lot of us we love our dogs. i love oscar and you love roxy. >> crazy about roxy. >> we need to get them together because they are antisocial from time to time. it's all about man's best friend. but, is man's best friend worth 1.5 million dollars? >> we will look at your screen. apparently this dog is. the most expensive dog in the world. a red tibetan mastive is the priceyest dog after being sold for 1.5 million. a big -- big splash was bought in northern china. weighing 180 pounds. they can reach 258 pounds. and red is not only considered a lucky color but in mastive from tibet they are thought to be holy animals blessing their owners were health and security. >> roxy blesses you and didn't cost 1.5. >> she was free. but a fancy furry dog and, of course, we were saying 1.5 million for a dog when you can get one at the pound. what do you think about this is it. >> that's the two cent hot topicp is there a limit to what yo
to undermine the cuban government. prosecutors say he faces 20 years in prison. the u.s. government is demanding his immediate release. >>> the nation is on storm watch, severe weather slamming much of the country. at one point tonight, there were flood watches and warnings in 20 states. in the louisiana, a tornado tore through. the twisters and downed power lines and destroyed dozens of homes. natural gas leaks forced more than 1000 to evacuate. tonight, the police are going door to door. >>> flooding created major traffic problems. drivers in indianapolis, heavy rain leaving 2 feet of standing water, turning roadways into reverse. some made it, others were stranded. >>> the battle for control rages in libya. rebel fighters are clashing in the streets with forces from the government credit for the civilians trying to escape, it is dangerous. the tug of war continues. forces loyal to gaddafi tried but failed to take over ricky oil town. rebels hoisted the flag symbolic of their movement. just outside of tripoli, there are reports of increased violence from government forces as they
coalition warplanes are flying toward libya, to control its skies. and for the first time, u.s. commanders say they're using the jets to attack gadhafi's troops on the ground. it may be working. in the key eastern city of misrata, gadhafi tanks are beginning to retreat, after a week-long assault on civilians. in ajabia, where gadhafi forces boxed in civilians for days, rebels have newfound confidence. >> this is a matter of time. time only. after, maybe one day, these tanks will surrender. >> reporter: president obama said sending in u.s. troops on the ground is absolutely out of the question. u.s. forces are already scaling back flights over libya. coalition troops are now flying more than half of the missions. >> reporter: bombed but not broken, gadhafi appeared for the first time in public tuesday night. he rallied supporters and portrayed himself as a victim to western powers on a mission to steal libya's oil. he gave no hint he was giving up. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show no mercy to anybody who has been in opposition. that's not exactly an invitation to negotiate.
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
fighting they captured a key city and held by punishing air strikes from u.s. and coalition forces. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richened engel is on the ground. richard, good morning. >> good morning, lester. we are on the outskirts of ajdabiya. this town clearly taken by the rebels and with considerable help. you can see beind me one of gadhafi's tanks that was obliterated by air strikes. the rebels have pushed about 50 miles to the west of here. so, advancing their frontline in the past 24 hours or so. they say they will continue this until they can reach some more gadhafi-held territory. this is a rebel now counteroffensive under way, assisted by the western airstrikes. lester? >> richer, the nato officials say they're not trying to actively assist the rebels but in trying to protect civilians. their bombs are helping. how far can the rebels advance and is gadhafi's army, in fact, crumbling? >> gadhafgadhafi's army certain this area is crumbling. when you look on the ground, we've seen 20 armored vehicles destroyed from the air. it seems this is not just a defensive operatio
questions. in that same interview i asked defense secretary gates will the u.s. have been fully pulled out of this mission by the end of 2011. secretary gates says there's no one who has an answer to that question. and the american people are skeptical and have a lot of questions. this military action has a 47% approval rating. that's allow. usually when the u.s. launches a military action there's a rally around the flag. you see numbers in the 60s and 70s. the president has his work cut out for him, that's why he's speaking to the american people tonight to boost his support and explain why they're there. >> and he will emphasize that no u.s. ground troops will be used. jake, thanks very much. we'll cover the president's address, diane sawyer will anchor at 7:30 eastern. and you can see it on abc. >> anxious to hear what the president is going to say. >>> there was an unusual apology from the vice president's office after a biden staffer ushered a reporter to a storage closet to wait there. it appears that they did not want the orlando sentinel talking before the vice president shows up.
odyssey dawn? were opposition forces in libya informed by the u.s., the u.k. or france about the existence of these war games which may have encouraged them to actions leading to greater repression and a humanitarian crisis? in short, was this war against gaddafi's libya planned? or was it a spontaneous response to the great suffering which gaddafi was visiting upon his opposition? congress hasn't even considered this possibility. nato, which has now taken over enforcement of the no-fly zone, has more from an organization which pledged mutual support to defend north atlantic states from aggression, they've moved from that to military operations reaching from libya to the chinese border in afghanistan. north atlantic treaty organization. we need to know and we need to ask what role french air force general and current supreme allied commander of nato for transportation may have played in the development of operation southern storm and in discussions with the u.s. and the expansion of the u.n. mandate into a nato operation. what has been the role of the u.s. african command and central comma
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
. the u.s. government now says robert levinson is alive and being held somewhere in southeast asia. it's asking iran for help reuniting levinson with his family. but iran says they know nothing. >>> the nfl and the players union have gone into overtime. they put another 24 hours on the clock to settle their labor dispute. midnight tonight is the new deadline for both sides to agree on the $9 billion revenue sharing package, or face the first work stoppage since 1987. >>> and airfares are taking off again. the major airlines are charging up to $20 more for round-trip domestic flights. it's the sixth time this year they've raised fares, thanks to high oil prices. >>> there's a major, new survey out on sex this morning. it shows abstinence is in. 28% say they have never had sexual contact with another person. many say, they're just too busy with other activities. >> it was another -- they never had that kind of thing. okay. >> okay. >> it's friday. >>> let's go -- happy friday. you were thinking it. >> fine. now, i have to take it. fine. good morning, everybody. and happy friday. let's ge
around a number of states and spoke to a series of people in the u.s. senators to congressman to beat on the left and right, journalists, and tanks, to ordinary citizens. the same preclusion kept leaping out again and again. most americans don't realize how lucky they are. you know, the political institutions that define this country are in many cases unique in almost all cases talking about the term, the recall mechanism. the initiative and referendum ballots procedure. i'm talking about states rights. i'm talking about open primaries in a totally unique feature, but one that makes legislatures answerable to the rest of us. and above all i'm talking about almost everybody from the share to the school board. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us. but it's these institutions growing organically out of the constitution that is serve to keep your government and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say well, there are cultural difference is. we are naturally people who got away from the monarchies and closets of the old world. i'm afraid that explan
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
this morning. george? >> okay, robin. thanks. >>> and for more on this, let's turn to the u.s. ambassador for the united nations, susan rice. good morning, ambassador rice. you saw the interview with christiane amanpour. yesterday, you called gadhafi delusional, accused of slaughtering his own people. he's continuing to attack rebel forces today. you listen to him and he sounds like a man who's not willing to go. are you hearing anything through diplomatic channels that he can be persuaded to go? or is this a fight to the death? >> good morning, george. good to be with you. i think the international community has joined with the people of libya, expressing their outrage at the killing and slaughtering and the frankly crazy behavior we've seen out of colonel gadhafi. the international community is going to keep the pressure on. the european union adopted strong sanctions yesterday, joining the united states, which has seized $30 billion in gadhafi-related assets. there's military contingency planning for humanitarian and other contingenciecontingencies. we're going to keep the pressure on
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)